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August 2017

 

 

 

 

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Background image -- Full Boxes of Honey On End Waiting for the Bees to Leave

 

Sunday August 20th 2017

Today A mix of sun and cloud. Hazy late this afternoon. High 23. UV index 6 or high.
Tonight Partly cloudy. Hazy. Low 9.

I went to bed around ten and got up finally at 0815 and I slept very poorly last night again. My weight is 214.2, BG is 7.1(!), and BP is 134/82.

These numbers suggest something is going on. My BG went up to 7.3 after an hour and a half and that is without breakfast.  Could it be the anti-histamines? Or allergies having an effect?

Antihistamines and decongestants allowed me to sleep but I woke up often. I hope this is not going to be a pattern ongoing. I am going to have to avoid alcohol entirely for a while as alcohol exacerbates allergies.

The allergy that triggered this bout was lawn mowing and maybe yeast in home-made wine.  I know I react to both, however, I'm pretty sure I picked up scabies -- probably in Mexico from a  tee shirt I bought from a beach vendor.  Someone with scabies must have tried it on before me, but that is just a guess.  I recall being very itchy a day or so after I first wore it and seeing some redness on my chest.

However, I could have just as easily picked it up here in Alberta -- or anywhere, like on an airplane.  Scabies can take a long time to progress to where it is noticeable, especially if a person is being bitten by mosquitoes and stung by bees.

I have treated twice now and am quite certain I have eliminated the mites since I see the welts going down and no new ones, but will treat again a time or two to be sure. The mites don't live long away from the host.

Even though the mites and eggs are dead, the allergic reaction apparently goes on for a month or more after, often getting worse before it gets better.  (Online references -- even the most reputable ones -- vary widely in their discussions of scabies.)

"Scabies is communicable until mites and eggs are destroyed by treatment, usually two courses 1 week apart. Itching may persist for 2 or more weeks after successful eradication of the mite." Ref.

I bought the recommended treatment -- permethrin ointment --  over-the-counter and did not bother seeing a doctor seeing as I mentioned it to my Mom's doctor and she glanced at the spots and said it was not likely.

I don't think she even really saw the spots I meant and word is on the scabies forums online that most doctors are quite ignorant of scabies in its various forms and also casual about treatment.

The treatment seems to have worked, but the itching is still ongoing, probably for a while.

Most people would probably not mention catching scabies, being embarrassed, but I figure that people need top know about scabies.  Scabies can be present for a long time and not be obvious until it reaches a certain point.  Although I suspect the tee shirt, I may have been carrying scabies for a long time. Regardless, I have dealt with it and am watchful now.

Scabies hits all classes and sorts of people indiscriminately.  There are some places where it is more common, but it can be everywhere.

It is not just bees that get mites.

I have to pick up the honey boxes this morning assuming the bees have abandoned overnight. 

Once they realize they are cut off from their queen, the bees abandon a broodless super and fly home at dusk or dawn.  Sometimes if the boxes are in contact with the hive, they walk from the supers down into the brood nest overnight .

Then I have to tidy and prepare for the garden party this afternoon, and pack for tomorrow's flight.

I began by rubbing myself down from the top of my head to my toes with permethrin cream.

I realize three rubdowns may be overkill, and the first treatment should have killed the scourge, but I have had enough of that intense and annoying itching.  Also I don't want to take a chance on spreading the itch and aim for 100% irradiation.

After three treatments, I still have some left.  I thought when I bought it that the price was high and that the amount in the bottle was overkill, but for eighty dollars they gave full measure and maybe they knew that one treatment is not enough or figured that most need to treat a family.  

The recommendation is to only apply the lotion from neck down, but online I could find no mention of harm from fuller application and people were pretty fast and loose with the rules, so I took a chance. 

In fact, to save money, people were making their own lotion from permetrin sold online for spraying clothing, camping gear and bedding and a body lotion. 

Apparently permethrin, used with reason is harmless to people, but repels and kills bugs of all sorts.  One poster mentioned that permethrin spray repels ticks and since he has been spraying his outdoor gear he has only had one tick while others in his party had many.  The people online seemed to find pure permethrin online easily.

I have had absolutely no discernable adverse reaction to the treatments thus far.  It seems just like any other body lotion.  I have always washed the cream off after eight or twelve hours as instructed.

I went out to get the supers that I left tilted up and found the truck would not keep running.  I knew the problem.  Bad gas and plugged filter.  I blew out the filter.

I suppose I should just drain the gas, but the truck runs fine when it can get gas and I have to get rid of the gas somehow.  At right: Gasoline should be clear like water.

I picked up the supers and found the bees were robbing lightly in the North Yard, but not the south.

I fiddled around and was ready by three.  We had a good party and everyone was gone by six-thirty.

Several guests were no-shows which is fine except that I have to plan the food and don't want extra since I am going away and besides the food is not the sort i eat normally anyhow, so I end up giving the leftovers to some of the guests. I also I try to invite enough people and a mix that will ensure each person has several compatible folks to chat with.  That was not a problem tonight, though, as the regulars all know one another and we always have a good time.

When leaving, Ruth took the rest of the recycle bags I have piled up over the past two years.  She had a full van when she left the other day. 

I just put everything that goes for recycling into one bin and bag it when full, then stack them up awaiting sorting. There must have been $200+ in bottles and cans there, but the work of sorting and delivering the various recycle items to the recycle centre and bottle depot is considerable.

I showered off the permethrin and washed dishes, then at 1930 found I was tired and had a nap. An hour later I can report that, so far, no itching.

I avoided alcohol at supper, remembering last night's problems.  We'll see if I can sleep through tonight.  I have to be out of here by about ten tomorrow morning. By supper, if all goes well, I'll be on a trawler at the dock in Sidney.

I was in bed by 2230 and slept well, but lightly, so I woke up around midnight and took two Benadryl for better sleep.  I was not at all itchy, so I think I have the mites licked.

A good scientist knows that science is not a democracy, that scientific truth is not determined 
by a show of hands, and that consensus and authority are there to be challenged, not to be
accepted without question. -- Dr. Frank Schnell, PhD.

All models are wrong but some are useful.
George E. P. Box

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Monday August 21st 2017

Today Mainly sunny. Hazy. High 25. UV index 5 or moderate.
Tonight Mainly cloudy. Clearing near midnight. Hazy. Low 10.

I slept well from there on through. At 0532 I awoke and and got up.  I was a bit groggy and very slightly congested, but well rested. BG is 6.0 and BP is 133/78, which are more normal numbers for me.

I have to leave by ten this morning and have a few chores to finish before I go.

We are expecting a 81% solar eclipse this morning at 10:22 in Calgary. I'm not too excited by this and doubt I'll look, but I do have welding lenses that are considered adequate for viewing. I expect I'll be on the road around then.

By eclipse time, I was in a taxi on my way to the airport and did not think of it until I saw people looking up in a parking lot. The eclipse amounted to almost nothing in Airdrie and was hardly noticeable, through the haze from forest fires.

The flight and taxi ride to Port Sidney was routine.  Mariners Compass, our Westcoast 46 was ready and Bob was already on site.  Bob and I walked uptown, he to the bank and I to the Chinese restaurant.  I had lunch and bought groceries, then we returned to the dock and did the checkout with Kyle, before untying and leaving for our next adventure.

Our ultimate destination is Powell River on the 26th, but for tonight, we had no idea. We figured we'd decide while underway.

We decided on Genoa Bay.  Bob had been there, but I had not been by boat and it was an easy run, allowing plenty of time before dark to anchor. r.

On arrival, we tried anchoring in forty feet of water and found the anchor, a stout Rocna, would not hold, so eventually found ourselves anchoring in twenty feet farther  into the bay. It seems that there are some permanent residents anchored in the farthest corner.

After settling in, we called it an early night just after dark.

A good scientist knows that science is not a democracy, that scientific truth is not determined 
by a show of hands, and that consensus and authority are there to be challenged, not to be
accepted without question. -- Dr. Frank Schnell, PhD.

All models are wrong but some are useful.
George E. P. Box

Yesterday's Post

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Tuesday August 22nd 2017

Today Mainly sunny. Wind becoming southeast 20 km/h this afternoon. High 29. UV index 7 or high.
Tonight Clear. Wind southeast 20 km/h becoming light this evening. Low 11.

I woke up at four and made coffee, French Vanilla I'd bought on impulse yesterday and got out the laptop.  I'd make porridge, but this boat has an electric stovetop and I'd have to start the generator, waking Bob and the whole anchorage nearby.  Uggh.  BG 5.7. is BP is 132/78

We are in no hurry this morning, having four hours to get to Dodds, by the eleven, for the first slack of the day in daylight.

Our tentative destination is Tribune Bay on Hornby Island, ten hours at seven knots.  We can do ten, but are being conservative.

We drop Mariners Compass at Westview on the 26th and I have been counting on spending the time between this delivery and the September 2nd boarding on Just Do It!, my Jeanneau 35, but won't if the boat gets booked. So far, it is still open (left).

We raised anchor at seven.  The sea was dead calm as we left Genoa Bay and motored towards Dodds.

We had time to kill and drifted a while off the entrance waiting, then joined the waiting boats.  A tug with a boom announced his intention to go through at the beginning of flood and we saw boats coming down sporadically. Many announced their intent.  Others just came through. 

We decided to go before the tug and a little before slack. We could see right through and when nobody was coming, we slipped past the crowd and motored up to the narrows hoping to find the choke point still clear. 

As it happened the crowd at the top was indecisive and we were able to power straight up and through the rapids.  At our slowest, in the narrowest section, we dropped to 6.9 knots from our maximum 10, suggesting a peak current of 3 knots against us.  Chatter on the  radio reflected the confusion of inexperienced boaters daunted by the rapids. One boat who had passed through claimed the current was 6 knots.  Others corrected him.

As we settled on our northeasterly course once clear the crowd, we passed many more boats approaching the Narrows expecting to go through at slack or just after.  I reflected on whether there is a protocol or just every man for himself. As far as I know, there is none other than downward bound boats have right of way in some rivers.  I posted the question online, with no luck"

"When boats are awaiting and transiting a narrows in Western Canadian tidal waters at or near slack water, which if any boats are the stand on vessels? Up bound, down bound, neither?

I realised that some of the waiting boaters expected the passage to be like a bank lineup, but with a variety of vessels and experience, there is no way that can ever work. 

Some timid captains are afraid to go even at the moment of reversing flow as there are residual whirlpools and turbulence. Some boats have limited power.  Others, like us just power through anytime as long as the route is clear and the flow is known to be less than half our maximum speed capability.

We congratulated ourselves on seizing the opportune moment and making and uneventful and direct passage when we could have been stuck in the crowd forever.  I wonder if some of the boats ever did go through.

The seas in the Strait were calm, but when we checked the forecast, we could see we would be crossing with a quartering seas tomorrow if we went to Tribune Bay tonight and changed course for Lund.  The passage was routine and we ran at 1600 RPM, making eight knots.  We took turns watching the scenery go by while the other napped or read.

We arrived at Lund at five-thirty and rafted to a Grand Banks 42.  The owners and crew were retired scientists and most interesting neighbours.  Bob and I went up to the hotel for a few beers, then returned and chatted with the neighbours a while, then turned in early.

A good scientist knows that science is not a democracy, that scientific truth is not determined 
by a show of hands, and that consensus and authority are there to be challenged, not to be
accepted without question. -- Dr. Frank Schnell, PhD.

All models are wrong but some are useful.
George E. P. Box

Yesterday's Post

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Wednesday August 23rd 2017

Today Mainly sunny. Wind becoming southeast 20 km/h gusting to 40 this afternoon. High 29. Humidex 33. UV index 7 or high.
Tonight Partly cloudy. Wind southeast 20 km/h gusting to 40 becoming light overnight. Low 14.

I slept well, with no congestion in spite of the beer and wine and got up at seven.

The early morning is dull and overcast as is often the case here on the coast, but warm enough that we left the doors open and I am barefoot this morning.

Bob went up and zipped on the enclosure curtains, anticipating some rain and cool wind, but yesterday, we were too warm up top, even with them open. We can stay until noon, but will likely leave earlier.

Once in Desolation Sound, we may be out of Internet and phone range for a while.

We left around nine and Bob took the helm.  We motored north through the Copeland Islands and turned east into Desolation Sound.  Bob had been to Desolation Sound on a cadets trip as a boy and wanted to prowl around to see how the locations he recalled look today, decades later.

We encountered rain and could see fog in the distance so we activated the radar to be sure it functions should we encounter fog and need it.  It did.  This boat has a top-notch navigation system.

As I write this, Bob is wandering around through various anchorages at an idle, trying to find a campsite he remembers from sixty years ago.

We eventually found ourselves deep in Melanie Cove and apparently this bay is a destination. The entire chain of bays is filled with anchored boats. 

     

A few dinghies prowl around and ferry people from boat to boat, but otherwise there is little activity.  Where we are the shore is not inviting.  Dense forest starts right at the shore.  Across from us there are some rocky hills that perhaps offer hiking, but I don't see anyone on them.

We arrived just after lunch, so the afternoon was spent reading and napping.  After a morning of rain and drizzle, the sun came out and the day turned warmer. I launched the dinghy and explored a bit, then returned.

I studied coastal navigation for a while and reviewed the radio license material.

I was surprised at how little of the radio material I had retained even though I had scored 100 on the exam just a few months ago.  Maybe it's because I find much of it quite unimportant for everyday operation. It is important, though, as I may find myself teaching this course.

I went to bed at nine just as darkness descended.

A good scientist knows that science is not a democracy, that scientific truth is not determined 
by a show of hands, and that consensus and authority are there to be challenged, not to be
accepted without question. -- Dr. Frank Schnell, PhD.

All models are wrong but some are useful.
George E. P. Box

Yesterday's Post

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Thursday August 24th 2017

Today A mix of sun and cloud. Hazy. Wind southwest 20 km/h gusting to 40. High 29. UV index 6 or high.
Tonight Mainly cloudy with 60 percent chance of showers this evening and risk of a thunderstorm. Clearing overnight. Hazy early this evening. Wind southwest 20 km/h gusting to 40 becoming northwest 40 gusting to 60 this evening then light after midnight. Low plus 5.

I woke up at ten to four, found I was wide awake, and got up.  I made coffee, had breakfast, and wrote a bit, then went back to bed and slept until the sun was up.  BG is 5.7, BP is 129/78.

I see I am missing some hot weather at home.

We raised anchor at dawn and proceeded out into the channel.  Bob wants to go up through Yaculta Rapids today and overnight at Big Bay.  These rapids are tricky in that they run at ten knots and only stop for a brief period every six hours or so.  He wants to get as much experience with new regions and techniques as he can.  He is coming along well, but gets distracted by irrelevant detail.

I'm not a details guy until I have to be.  I start with the big picture, then zoom in to see if there is a devil hiding in the details.  Too much detail can be paralyzing, though, and I have seen many new sailors worried or even frightened by details on the bottom one hundred feet down that are shown on nautical charts. The only detail that matters is the detail near or on the surface.

We were making good time and decided to divert to Arran Narrows for an easier passage.  We had a bit of time to kill and drifted around out in the channel waiting for the turn.  I took a nap while Bob stood watch.  When I awoke, I could see we had to hustle to make the slack, but made it right on time, and seeing as we were already above the Gillard Islands, we decided to continue on up Cordero Channel and ended the day at Blind Channel Resort around four.

We sat on the patio and drank beer until supper, then returned to the boat.  I had a bite, then another nap.  I woke up around eight and checked the dock lines, then checked the tides and routes for tomorrow.  Bob announced that we would have to leave late and I said it looked to me that we should leave at first light to make the turn at Seymour Narrows around eight-thirty, but I needed to gather data on first light, currents and times, and make measurements and calculations before I was ready to discuss the question.

First light is at five fifty, allowing two hours and forty minutes to make the twenty-one miles.  We'd have to make seven point nine knots which should be easy, riding the flood. The distances to Seymour, Surge or Hole in the Wall are all about the same, so if we can leave before six, we will be through the narrows by nine and then have thirty-five miles left to Powell River.  We don't have to be there until Saturday morning.

I went to bed at nine, but found I was awake, so got up and took the opportunity to catch this page up to present.

A good scientist knows that science is not a democracy, that scientific truth is not determined 
by a show of hands, and that consensus and authority are there to be challenged, not to be
accepted without question. -- Dr. Frank Schnell, PhD.

All models are wrong but some are useful.
George E. P. Box

Yesterday's Post

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Friday August 25th 2017

Today Sunny. Becoming a mix of sun and cloud this afternoon. Wind becoming southeast 20 km/h gusting to 40 this afternoon. High 21. UV index 6 or high.
Tonight Partly cloudy. Becoming clear this evening. Wind southeast 20 km/h gusting to 40 becoming light this evening. Low 6.

I was up at five and cast off the lines at 0545.  I had to wake Bob.

I pushed the boat out of the slip and pointed towards Johnstone Strait in the semi-dark, then sent Bob up to activate the flybridge helm.  By the time I went up, the day was breaking and improved visibility allowed us to proceed at full speed.

The current was behind us as expected and soon we were making over ten knots.

A good scientist knows that science is not a democracy, that scientific truth is not determined 
by a show of hands, and that consensus and authority are there to be challenged, not to be
accepted without question. -- Dr. Frank Schnell, PhD.

All models are wrong but some are useful.
George E. P. Box

Yesterday's Post

<< Previous Page                           Top                               Next Page >>

   Home | Current Diary Page | Top | Today | End | Selected Beekeeping Topics | Search HoneyBeeWorld.com   
       Diary Archives - 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011| 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 |1999      
 My Weather Station | Honey Bee World Forum | HoneyBeeWorld List | Contact me 

 

 

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