A Beekeeper's Diary

Everything happens to everybody sooner or later, if there is time enough.
--- George Bernard Shaw ---

<< Previous Page        January 1st to 10th, 2004        Next Page >>
Left panel on?
Yes | No

 
I can take one (picture) tomorrow of the Russian breeder colonies tomorrow if that is OK.  They are in five frame nucs.

Try this one for now " typical fall swarm call"

Charlie
Harper's Honey Farm
http;//www.russianbreeder.com
Ph# 337 896 5247

Home | Current Diary Page
Diary Archives | Selected Beekeeping Topics
My Weather Station | Honey Bee World Forum | HoneyBeeWorld List | Write me
Search HoneyBeeWorld.com
Back to the top

Thursday 1 January 2004
I'm retired now, and days or weeks may pass between beekeeping articles  I recommend visiting pages from previous years.

One Year ago | Two years ago | Three Years ago | Four Years ago | Forum | Sale | Home | Write me

I've always found paranoia to be a perfectly defensible position. -- Pat Conroy

Orams stayed until late afternoon.  John and Julie Hillis came over to visit a while.  It was a cold day, with a chill wind.  I took out the ashes, and that was enough of the outdoors for me.

Today : Cloudy with sunny periods. Wind northwest 20 km/h. High minus 8. / Tonight : Cloudy periods. 30 percent chance of flurries. Low minus 22. / Normals for the period : Low minus 16. High minus 4.

Friday 2 January 2004
I'm retired now, and days or weeks may pass between beekeeping articles  I recommend visiting pages from previous years.

One Year ago | Two years ago | Three Years ago | Four Years ago | Forum | Sale | Home | Write me

There are a terrible lot of lies going around the world, and the worst of it is half of them are true.
Sir Winston Churchill

Another cold day.  I'm debating whether to go to Texas or not.  The meeting is less than a week away, and then there is Florida.  That one I am definitely attending.  I've reserved a room at each, but can cancel the Texas one if I decide not to go.  I guess I'll check with my travel agent and see what I can do.  The two meetings are 1,000 miles and two days apart.  Last year Joe and I spent 10 days going to the meetings and three of those days were spent in airports and planes.  Direct flights, I enjoy, but the hub and spoke method of getting places is a huge waste of time.

Not only that, but in the last few days, there have been flight disruptions and increased security hassle.  Joe just got back from Holland, and does not have his landed immigrant card.  I gather he will not be able to travel until he gets one, so he won't be going, I assume.  I've agreed to meet Aaron at Jackson, but if I go to TX, I'll be traveling alone.  That's not too bad, but, with the price  of rooms and cars, its nice to have someone to share the cost.  At least the Canadian dollar has a bit more power this time.  It is now 77c US.  Last year, it was 63c.  That's the difference between a $US100 room costing $130 and $159.

If you got a 404 message -- and lots did -- looking for this page, the change of year was to blame.  I started a new folder for 2004, and apparently forgot to upload it.  Sorry.

I'm always looking for good beekeeping pictures for the top of these pages.  If you have a 640x480 or bigger picture of a yard of bees or something of the sort, let me know.  Maybe I'll feature some interesting bee yards.  I hope so.  Letters are welcome, too.

I went off a bit half-cocked this morning in response to a post by Yoon on BEE-L about his oxalic treatment of his bees.  Somehow I took his message to be talking about sucrose octanoate esters (SOE), not oxalic acid (OA).  He had misstated the concentration as being 30%, (he later clarified that he meant 30g in 1 litre) but, initially, it sounded really drastic and off-label.

We got it all sorted out and fortunately everyone was pretty mellow about it.  Okay, he did not abuse SOE, but, then oxalic is not approved in the USA at all.  It should be, but it isn't.  I really don't know what to say in such case.  Technically such use is wrong, but, as I see it, there is almost no risk to anyone, except maybe the applicator.  We really need to work on getting approval for OA.

Today : Flurries. High minus 18. / Tonight : Cloudy. 60 percent chance of flurries. Low minus 28. / Normals for the period : Low minus 16. High minus 4.

Saturday 3 January 2004
I'm retired now, and days or weeks may pass between beekeeping articles  I recommend visiting pages from previous years.

One Year ago | Two years ago | Three Years ago | Four Years ago | Forum | Sale | Home | Write me

It's minus thirty today, and we are running low on coal.  We're good until Monday and have a load coming then.  We're having a winter that is colder than average, while it he East, the winter has been warm.  Over Christmas, we warmed up to normals, but now we are back in the deepfreeze.

The opposite of talking isn't listening. The opposite of talking is waiting. -- Fran Lebowitz

I was up early and plugged in  the car, since I have to go to Airdrie to see Frank and Mike and meet with Willy.  The car starts okay at minus twenty or colder, but I think it is easier on it -- and me -- if I preheat it a bit.  I've heard that these newer cars shouldn't be plugged in since the warm water from the block heater fools the computer into doing odd things, but I also think that maybe this advice does not apply below minus thirty.  I know my Mom's new car came without a block heater, and the dealer did not recommend one.  These new, smaller engines are easier to crank than the old V8s, and batteries are better than they used to be.

I've been asking for pictures, and my friends have been supplying.  To the point where I'm having trouble deciding how to use them all.  Seems it's feast or famine.   Don't stop!   Temporary oversupply is a good thing.  Please keep sending them, even If I don't publish them immediately.  I appreciate every single one, and I will need them soon enough.

On the right is a shot of one of Charlie's yards.  Charlie is the official supplier of the USDA Russian queens. 

He says, "...wish I was set up for production queens as I would almost be booked up by now. I get at least 2 or 3 request for prices a day even turned down an order for 1000 queens and several for 100. Will be headed for TX Tuesday for the AHPA meeting."

 Visit him at http://www.russianbreeder.com  or take in his talk at the AHPA convention this coming week.

I have some shots from friends in B.C., too.  These are good.  They will headline soon. Thanks.

Today : Cloudy. 60 percent chance of flurries early this morning. Clearing this morning. Wind north 20 km/h. Temperature falling to minus 30 by evening. / Tonight : Cloudy periods. Temperature steady near minus 28. / Normals for the period : Low minus 16. High minus 4

Sunday 4 January 2004
I'm retired now, and days or weeks may pass between beekeeping articles  I recommend visiting pages from previous years.

One Year ago | Two years ago | Three Years ago | Four Years ago | Forum | Sale | Home | Write me

Adony came by in the morning, stayed for lunch, and left mid-afternoon.  We had a good visit and covered the usual range of topics. 

Meijers came for supper.

The intelligent man finds almost everything ridiculous, the sensible man hardly anything.
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Something I learned today, if I understand correctly, is that there are two mechanisms of oxytetracycline resistance and that they seem to have migrated through the world's bacterial populations by means of plasmid transfer, originating from bacteria that had the properties all along, possibly soil bacteria that generated OTC or a similar antibiotic and therefore had to be immune to it.  The mechanisms apparently are 1.) a protective cap or barrier of some sort at the point where OTC acts, or 2.) a the ability to excrete or otherwise eliminate the OTC before it acts.

This is all of interest because it reflects on the rumour that grease patty administration of OTC was somehow responsible for the appearance of OTC resistant AFB (rAFB).  I have insisted all along that this was merely a theory based on a coincidence, and that worldwide trade in honey had spread a tougher variety of the disease from some previously isolated corner of the world, or that the resistant varieties has arisen through close contact between AFB bacteria and bacteria carrying the resistant trait. This revelation seems to lend curability to that stand.

Given a choice of explanations for some event, many researchers and beekeepers seem always to choose the explanation that blames someone or something we do or did, over one that says it is a result of natural or random occurrence. Although the grease patty hypothesis was never proven, it fit that criterion, and researchers are still afraid to investigate the use of grease patties for application of Tylosin because of the fear of somehow being considered irresponsible.  A false rumour is hard to dispel. 

Grease patties are the logical vehicle for Tylosin IMO, since a drug applied in grease patties is consumed at a consistent and visible rate that can be designed and monitored, and can be removed if necessary.  The other methods under consideration are syrup, which has proven to cause a serious residue problem and dust or protein patties, which are consumed quickly and at uneven rates, requiring tinkering by the applicator, or leaving the hive unprotected too soon, while delivering an inconsistent dose.

Today : Sunny with cloudy periods. Wind northwest 20 km/h. Temperature steady near minus 24. Wind chill minus 36. / Tonight : Clear. Wind becoming northwest 20 km/h this evening. Low minus 25. Wind chill minus 36. / Normals for the period : Low minus 16. High minus 4.

Monday 5 January 2004
I'm retired now, and days or weeks may pass between beekeeping articles  I recommend visiting pages from previous years.

One Year ago | Two years ago | Three Years ago | Four Years ago | Forum | Sale | Home | Write me

Here are two more bee yard pictures.

Attached are two pic's of some bear damage last spring 2003.

Northern Michigan
Michael


The best way to become acquainted with a subject is to write a book about it.
Benjamin Disraeli

I've been thinking more about the possible ill effects of oxalic acid and looked up a few links.  I'm curious why it hurts varroa, damages humans, but apparently does not harm bees when used with care.

Oxalic acid MSDS sheets  1.  2.    Oxalic acid Poisoning: search  1.  2.  3.  4.  5.

Below is a copy of a letter that has been sent to the directors of the CHC for distribution to their association members. There is also a notice on the news page of our website www.honeycouncil.ca.

So far the response has been good and we have several pledges from beekeepers who like the idea of an alternate treatment. If you have an email distribution list it would be appreciated if you can pass this message along so that we can reach as many beekeepers as possible.

Thanks
Heather


Dear Beekeeper

Oxalic acid has recently been registered in Europe for the treatment of varroa mites. Small scale trials in Canada show that it is a useful tool in an Integrated Pest Management program.

There are a number of good reasons for registering oxalic acid in Canada:

1. oxalic acid is showing great promise in field trials in Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick.

2. oxalic acid is not a synthetic chemical and will not accumulate in the food chain

3. establishing an official procedure and an MRL for oxalic acid reduces the risk of residues that might result from incorrect dosage or timing.

4. oxalic acid has been registered in Europe and the data package is available to our industry for registration in Canada - for a fee.

5. The PMRA would accept the European data in addition to Canadian trials.

6. CHC is a not for profit corporation and if we are the registrant in this process, the PMRA has informed us that we may apply for a reduction in the registration fees. This would be a saving to our industry as there would be no fees charged back to the beekeepers or suppliers.

Since oxalic acid is readily available there is no economic reason for a drug company to pursue the registration of oxalic acid. The CHC would like to facilitate the registration of oxalic acid but we need your help to accomplish this task.

The estimated cost of the project is $30,000 including fees for the data package, PMRA registration fees, preparation time, consulting fees and travel to pre-submission meeting.

The estimated saving to beekeepers in pesticide reduction is $4 per hive per year. We are requesting a donation of $0.20 per hive (eg. $100 for 500 hives) from all beekeepers.

The CHC will approach corporate sponsors who are willing to partially support the registration process but we believe that the majority of the funds should be from those who benefit most- the beekeepers of Canada.

In order to start the application process as soon as possible we need your contribution by January 31st.

The CHC receipt issued for contributions received can be used as an eligible business expense. Please make the cheque payable to the CHC and indicate in your letter that it is for the oxalic acid registration project. The oxalic registration fund will be kept separate from other monies and all payments in and out of the fund will be carefully accounted. Thank you for your support.

Heather Clay
Canadian Honey Council
Suite 236, 234-5149 Country Hills Blvd NW Calgary AB T3A 5K8
ph. 403-208-7141 fax 403-547-4317
www.honeycouncil.ca


Allen,

Thank you for bringing to light the full details of the CHC's position of sponsorship and intent to see the registration of Oxalic Acid in Canada hopefully come to fruition in a manner such as written by Ms. Clay of the CHC.

The CHC is wise to take this position, I certainly hope that Mr. Gene Brandi, Chairman of the National Honey Board here in the USA will take a similar position.

The following short quotation of Ms. Clay's mailing rings true for the US as well: "Since oxalic acid is readily available there is no economic reason for a drug company to pursue the registration of oxalic acid. The CHC would like to facilitate the registration of oxalic acid but we need your help to accomplish this task."

Perhaps this could be the start of something really great, Beekeepers and Honey Board both supporting each other in a project that has never be done before: Pesticide Registration!

Field studies, "labeling", a Material Safety Data Sheets, and other matters need to be resolved before oxalic acid could ever be approved in the US by the EPA. IF the NHB could take the responsibility to task would it be a great political plus! I expect that there are enough resources within the ranks of Beekeepers of America, to volunteer their expertise of their individual avocations as well as their hives in order to facilitate any need that may arise in order that costs could be kept to a minimum.

Regards and Best Wishes to All Canadians

Chuck Norton Norton's Nut & Honey Farm Reidsville, NC

Today : Sunny with cloudy periods. Wind northwest 20 km/h becoming light this afternoon. High minus 16. Wind chill minus 34. / Tonight : Clear. Wind west 20 km/h becoming light this evening. Low minus 21. Wind chill minus 30. / Friday : Sunny. Low minus 10. High minus 2. / Normals for the period : Low minus 16. High minus 4.

Tuesday 6 January 2004
I'm retired now, and days or weeks may pass between beekeeping articles  I recommend visiting pages from previous years.

One Year ago | Two years ago | Three Years ago | Four Years ago | Forum | Sale | Home | Write me

To succeed in the world it is not enough to be stupid, you must also be well-mannered.
Voltaire

Well, I am not going to Texas, but will go to Florida.  That is set.

I decided to warm up the motorhome yesterday to see how good the furnace is.  It was minus twenty out, and I warmed it as high as plus four, but then turned the heat off overnight.  This morning, I turned it on and within hours, the interior was at pus 15 for a 35 degree C rise.  Not bad.  I then washed the storm windows and put them on and the temp went up another five in a few minutes.  All told, I burned a half tank of propane on the gauge, so, if I go skiing for more than two days at minus twenty, or it is windy, I need to carry an extra tank.  Of course, I seldom go out skiing at minus twenty -- it is too cold for casual enjoyment, especially if there is wind.  Minus ten is tolerable, but I've camped out as cold as minus forty, and some memorable days at Nakiska, when I took my level two snowboard instructors' course, were minus thirty.

I also am still working on the heating project, trying to nail down projected costs.  I am spoiled by coal.  I have always said my furnace is 250,000 BTU, but, I got to thinking and found that it is actually capable of almost 700,000.  We are trying to calculate what gas boiler would do the same job or at least 50% of it.  I don't know the efficiency, so I calculated what our average fuel use is.  Turns out we use 200,000 BTU per hour average over November, December, January, and February, and less in other months.  Considering that the furnace is working about half the time on average, that means that our input BTU must be at least 400,000.  If coal is 50-60% efficient, then our output is 200-240,000 BTU.  We had been thinking of a 150,000 BTU, 92% efficient gas unit, and can see that it would need help, or we would have to close off areas some of the time, when it is windy or very cold.

Today : Sunny. High minus 12. / Tonight : Cloudy periods. Low minus 19. / Normals for the period : Low minus 16. High minus 4.

Wednesday 7 January 2004
I'm retired now, and days or weeks may pass between beekeeping articles  I recommend visiting pages from previous years.

One Year ago | Two years ago | Three Years ago | Four Years ago | Forum | Sale | Home | Write me

Today : Cloudy with sunny periods. 30 percent chance of flurries this afternoon. High minus 9. / Tonight : Cloudy periods. Clearing near midnight. Temperature rising to minus 3 by morning. / Normals for the period : Low minus 16. High minus 4.

There are only two kinds of men: the righteous who believe themselves sinners; and the sinners who believe themselves righteous
Blaise Pascal

I spent a good part of the day studying up on boilers and hot water heating.  Boilers are turning out to be a technical topic and there are many suppliers, with models that can operate at various efficiencies and some which can step up and down (modulate) through various heat ranges.  I've looked more at coal systems as well.

Heather called last night and mentioned that Peter Kevan, a professor at Guelph, is working on a bee nutrition project.  My discussions with Gard Otis had not gone well, since he basically expected us beekeepers to cough up a lot of money and hives, then leave everything to him to do his way.

I know that would never fly with my friends; we are looking for people to work with us and for us on our projects.  If we can find others that are going the same direction, then we can co-operate and contribute money, but I cannot imagine beekeepers just donating funds to someone who will not respect their opinions and wishes when  it comes to spending their money.  Too much of the 'research money' in the past has disappeared down black holes with little to show for it except talk when it was all spent.  Beekeepers will spend money on specific projects, in the their own neighbourhood, that promise to address their objectives, but have grown skeptical about contributing for non-specific projects, or to undefined distant persons.

It seems Peter is likely to be more interested in what we have in mind.  We'll see.

I called Peter and left a message, and he called back.  We chatted for an hour, and I think that maybe, he's our man.  He said he would work out a proposal to be a basis for discussion and get back to me.

Ellen and I went to supper at Purves-Smiths.  We had a good time.

Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction.
Blaise Pascal

Thursday 8 January 2004
I'm retired now, and days or weeks may pass between beekeeping articles  I recommend visiting pages from previous years.

One Year ago | Two years ago | Three Years ago | Four Years ago | Forum | Sale | Home | Write me

I worked on boilers and bookwork today, then went to town to get some weather-stripping to caulk a few cracks where we are losing heat.  I was shocked at the price.  Weather-stripping costs more than coal.

I also finalized my plans for the ABF meeting and will have a few extra days after for business, or sight-seeing, if no business comes up.  I always plan a few extra days on the end of a business trip so that I can respond to opportunities.  One such lucky strike was the visit Joe and I made to see the Lusbys in Arizona several years back.

Allen's
Links
of the Day

"metapad is a great choice for those who like their text editors small, fast, and free" - ZDNet Downloads

Visit my security page and get some free software and system scans, before you get hijacked, not after.  I'm hearing from too many smart people who are getting caught by the bad guys and losing data and suffering loss of sleep.  If you read and understand my recommendations and follow them, you should be pretty darned safe.  It'll take you a few hours, but if you don't take time now, and get hit, you may lose days, or even weeks of work.  You can pay now or you can pay later.  It is much cheaper to pay some attention now.

Today : A mix of sun and cloud. Wind southwest 20 km/h. High 1. / Tonight : Clear. Low minus 6. / Normals for the period : Low minus 16. High minus 4.

Friday 9 January 2004
I'm retired now, and days or weeks may pass between beekeeping articles  I recommend visiting pages from previous years.

One Year ago | Two years ago | Three Years ago | Four Years ago | Forum | Sale | Home | Write me

The only reason some people get lost in thought is because it's unfamiliar territory.
Paul Fix

Just another day around the place.  I noticed the other day that I was not maintaining BeeGadgets, a list I run at Yahoo!  I cleared a backlog of posts and referred the group to some pictures that were sent to me in response to my request for digital photos.


BEE-L is the oldest bee list on the Internet.  It has been around a long time, and in fact, I have been on it for ten years, now.  For the most part, the list is a very good one.

It has evolved  over the years; at one time, BEE-L was open to all and any emails that were sent there, and a bit chatty, but, as the net evolved, and new forums sprung up, and as traffic grew, the focus of the list changed more to being a central meeting point, and chatter was discouraged and to make that clear, the header became, "For Informed Discussion of Beekeeping Issues and Bee Biology".

Moderation was introduced to ensure balance between proven fact, and some of the cult concepts that have vocal, evangelical constituencies, which seemed at various times, determined to overwhelm the list -- and also to discourage chatting and grandstanding.

Although these rules and conditions are published for all to read, and a condition of list 'membership', somehow, a few people have the idea that the list is -- rather than a private domain that all are permitted to share under certain conditions -- somehow, public property and that everyone, must have the right to do what they want, when they want, and that anything else is censorship.  That is not the case.  No one has the right to be 'published' on BEE-L any more than anyone has the right to be published in Bee Culture magazine.

The list has always had an owner, and at present, that owner is Aaron Morris.  At one time the list was totally open and unmanaged, and it became clear at one point, that if it continued the way it was, that it would soon be closed down. It is a lot of work to own and maintain a list, like BEE-L, but Aaron does it as a public service, at some personal cost, and has several friends help him out.  He has a developed and published a clear set of guidelines to make the list what he expects of it.  Unfortunately, he does not always get the respect he deserves for his selfless devotion to the list and, in fact several people have taken to harassing him and slandering him, his assistants, and his list.  Why they don't just get with the program or go away I don't know.  It's big world, with room for everyone.  I guess some people just like being miserable, and try to make sure everyone else is too.

I am one of those who helps Aaron out, and, as longtime readers here know, although I have resigned from the job several times, I've been repeatedly cajoled back into service.  It's not a bad job, except for having to deal with a few rude and self-centred people.  That part is a thankless job, so I spent a few hours writing up a clarification especially for those who cannot understand the rules and conditions for subscribing to BEE-L.

Let me know if it is not clear enough.


The weather warmed up to freezing again today and the furnace is running less.  Ellen installed some weather-stripping in her studio.  I'm starting to think of going to Jacksonville.  Aaron is leaving early tomorrow morning.

Frankly, I'm finding the winter depressing and, although I am reluctant to leave, I'm sure the trip will do me some good.

Today : Cloudy with sunny periods. Wind west 20 km/h. High 4. / Tonight : Cloudy. Low zero. / Normals for the period : Low minus 16. High minus 4

<< Previous Page                                      Next Page >>

Local radar and satellite weather charts

Three Hills Area Weather Forecast
Intellicast | Yahoo | Weather Channel
Webcams  | Banff  | Banff | Sunshine Village | Calgary
Satellite Pictures 1
Canadian temperatures are in degrees Celsius

allen's Computer Security Page
A collection of helpful ideas and links
Free Online Virus Scans
 Panda | Trend Micro
Free Online Security Check

Convert Currency | Convert Measurements
Convert Celsius to Fahrenheit >
Chart
  Calculator

   "If I make a living off it, that's great -- but I come from a culture where you're valued
not so much by what you acquire but by what you give away,"
-- Larry Wall (the inventor of Perl)
Please report any problems or errors to Allen Dick
allen dick 1999-2012. Permission granted to copy in context for non-commercial purposes, and with full attribution.

Home